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Historical birthday traditions revolved around the belief that evil spirits were attracted to people on the anniversary of their birth (aka their birth-day). Traditionally, family and friends would gather around the birthday boy or girl to laugh aloud, extend good wishes, and visit to make a lot of noise to scare off nefarious evil spirits. Common Christians in Medieval times celebrated the individual birth days of the Saints they were named after. If you celebrated your actual birthday in Medieval times, you were someone of privilege.

August is a celebration month because August is the birthday month of my sisters.

“Happy Birthday, Sister” by 1HappyBirthday.com

Funny. This thing called “birth” days. A little holiday honoring the day of your birth. Beth Herman, a freelance writer interested in healthy living, food, family, animal welfare, design, architecture, religion and yoga writes for a variety for national and regional publications, institutions and websites states in this article about The History of Birthdays,

“The most sung song in history was written and published by two sisters known to defy the constricting roles of women in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.”

Beth Herman, Farmer’s Almanac, Home & Garden

The Hill Sisters, Patty and Mildred, wrote a song titled “Good Morning to All” in 1893 during the progressive education movement of the time to help children learn to sing. The lyrics to the catchy pre-“Happy Birthday” tune went a little something like this:              

  “Good morning to you,
               Good morning to you,
               Good morning, dear children,
               Good morning to all.”


The lyrics to the Hill Sisters’ Little Loomhouse School song were changed to the “Happy Birthday” lyrics we all know in 1912. Over the years the copyrights of the lyrics to “Happy Birthday” have been in dispute until 2016 when the rights to the lyrics to “Happy Birthday” officially were declared public domain.

“Happy Birthday” in Medieval Times

All Hail the Blue Night – Mark Vigean

Historical birthday traditions revolved around the belief that evil spirits were attracted to people on the anniversary of their birth (aka their birth-day). Traditionally, family and friends would gather around the birthday boy or girl to laugh aloud, extend good wishes, and visit to make a lot of noise to scare off nefarious evil spirits.

Common Christians in Medieval times celebrated the individual birth days of the Saints they were named after. If you celebrated your actual birthday in Medieval times, you were someone of privilege.

Make a “Happy Birthday” Wish

Why do we blow out birthday candles?

The idea of romping around town loudly scaring away evil spirits typically would make me frown, but sending good wishes to my sisters (sisters from another mother included) is worth it. Magic happens when treating others to mini works of art birthday cards.

The ever-growing Death of the Mall movement permanently closed the doors to my favorite stationary store, I had to go on the hunt for the perfect birthday card. I ventured into my favorite bookstore once but ended up getting lost for hours among my other favorite pieces of paper art (and without the perfect birthday card.) Running an errand to my business suite address put me on the path to the most beautiful collection of paper art I’ve ever laid eyes on.

Quilling, the art of rolling, coiling and shaping small strips of paper to create a 3D design was practiced for centuries. Like their spiritually guided birthday traditions, ancient Egyptian artists used bird’s feathers (quills) as a tool to coil paper into individualized pieces of art to be given to the privileged.

Quilling made its introduction throughout the Western world during the Renaissance when nuns and monks would trim gilded paper from books to adorn religious objects and to replace the use of costly gold filigree. Women practiced quilling to DIY upscale household décor like picture frames, baskets, and jewelry boxes; while affluent women used quilling as a leisurely pastime.

Today, Quilling Card, LLC, a member of the Fair Trade Federation, has become the premiere source of preserving and sharing the art quilling. Visit www.QuillingCard.com

“Don’t send a card. Send art!”

Wilhelmina DeHauge
Wilhelmina DeHauge

“Happiness is creating and developing something new and beautiful to share with others.”

Talent acquisition lifestyle research content author loves helping small businesses find and connect with their target audience through innovative digital marketing and creative story-telling.

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